Xiaolongbao

xiaolongbao1[1]

Quick facts:

  • is a type of Chinese steamed bun which originated from Shanghai
  • literal translation is  “little-basket buns” because  it is traditionally steamed in small bamboo baskets
  • usually steamed or boiled
  • usually filled with pork or minced crabmeat
  • commonly served at dim sum
http://newyork.cbslocal.com/

http://newyork.cbslocal.com/

Apparently there is a proper technique to eating Xiaolongbao.   The filling in these dumplings  also contain a heap of jellylike aspic, which melts into a broth upon steaming—making them a little challenging to eat.

http://brandoesq.blogspot.com/

http://brandoesq.blogspot.com/

You will want to eat these dumplings the moment they arrive at your table before the sauce inside congeals.

http://newyork.seriouseats.com/

http://newyork.seriouseats.com/

So how do you eat them without burning your mouth and squirting sauce all over yourself.  It’s your lucky day!  Here is a short video tutorial.

 

 

Or they have a “How to Eat Xiaolongbao For Dummies” catered specially for tourists I think.  These are supersize Xiaolongbaos.

gmanetwork.com

gmanetwork.com

I’ve never tried Xiaolongbao but this post certainly has me interested and you can be sure I will be on the lookout for it the next time I am at dim sum.

Have you ever tried Xiaolongbao?  Would you enjoy the challenge of eating these dumplings?

20 comments to Xiaolongbao

  • Raquel  says:

    OMG! YES!

    I had a roommate from China and she made these and filled them with red bean paste. I know that prob doesn’t sound appetizing but they were delicious… it reminded me of yams. I totally miss them :( and her, for that matter. For a semester I roomed with her, a friend from Vietnam and a friend from Korea. I was spoiled with amazing food nonstop. It was awesome.

    • Lila  says:

      Raquel, I have had red bean paste dumplings and they are yummy but these are a little different. These have broth inside and most fillings for dumplings are moist but not as juicy as these. How lucky were you to have such a varied group of roomies with good culinary skills! Sounds like they were good friends too. Lucky you. Like attracts like. :)

  • Liz A.  says:

    I have never heard of that. Nice handling of X, by the way. Sounds pretty good.

    • Lila  says:

      Liz, Thanks for dropping by. I had never heard of these dumplings either before writing this post. I was lucky in my topic choice-I know a lot of people probably struggled with the letter X. Headed to your blog now. :)

  • Tarkabarka  says:

    Oh wow, lovely blog! It made me both hungry and desperately wishing to visit all these countries. Thanks for the visit!

    @TarkabarkaHolgy from
    Multicolored Diary – Tales of colors
    MopDog – The crazy thing about Hungarians…

    • Lila  says:

      So glad you dropped by. Glad you enjoyed the pictures and these countries are definitely worth visiting especially for the food. Headed to your blog now. :)

  • Corinne  says:

    Hmmm, don’t know if I’ve had this or not, but they look absolutely delicious!

    • Lila  says:

      Corinne,
      These buns are not as common an item on dim sum menus but I am going to hunt them down and thankfully Las Vegas has some fantastic Chinese restaurants. I am sure they will be hot, hot, hot and yummy. :)

  • Contented Traveller  says:

    They look fantastic. I had not heard of these before :)

    • Lila  says:

      I had not heard of this until I wrote this post and aim to try them the next time I am at dim sum. They look delicious. :)

  • Nana Prah  says:

    Those look amazing. I would try it. I’d probably make a huge mess, but I’d lick my fingers clean. Most likely, my shirt too.

    • Lila  says:

      Nana,
      I am with you on this one. I would probably make a huge mess and enjoy it immensely. Do you have a Chinatown or good Chinese restaurants by you?

  • Raquel  says:

    Lila, I realized much later that I jumped the gun with the comment 😉 I got wayyy too excited, even though I totally read about the broth it didn’t occur to me til way later… wait a minute! What I ate before didn’t have broth in it! Ahhhhh well. I am extremely enthusiastic about red bean paste, let’s just say that 😉

    • Lila  says:

      Raquel,
      I love red bean paste too and usually buy the red bean paste steamed buns for my daughter because she is a semi vegetarian. They are delicious. Have you tried the red bean moon cakes? I think you would enjoy those too. :)

  • Calli  says:

    Sounds delicious, and a movie clip helping people eat them is such a wonderful idea. Sometimes I struggle when trying new foods :)

    • Lila  says:

      Calli,
      Yes I thought the video tutorial would be fun and helpful. We have all struggled with different foods and I think people in general don’t quite mind how you eat it especially if you are able to express your enjoyment for it. :)

  • Pamela Hunnisett  says:

    Oh YUMMY! I’ve had these before – I just didn’t know the name! Thanks for the education!

    • Lila  says:

      Pamela,
      You’re most welcome. Glad you’ve tried them-they sound delicious. :)

  • Peter  says:

    They are called soup dumplings in New York. You can find them in quite a few places in New York City. If you do visit, find them at Nan Xiang http://m.yelp.com/biz/nan-xiang-dumpling-house-flushing
    They are made to order and very addictive! Joe’s Shanghai also has them but they use a lot of MSG and they are pre-made so they’re not as fresh.

    As for the red bean filling ones, they’re not dumplings at all. They’re red bean buns. Hope this helps.

  • Kieran  says:

    Hurrah! In the end I got a blog from where
    I know how to genuinely get useful information regarding my study and knowledge.

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